After updating BIOS, my network interface name changed

After updating BIOS, my network interface name changed from enp24p0 to enp5p0, but whyyyy?! It's like ... stupid. Everything stopped working - firewall changed zone to default "public" which has everything blocked; pi-hole stopped accepting dns requests from external devices. everyone was angry because "net was down" (because dns didn't work).
It's not like network card MAC or hardware or anything changed, it did not. Why did Manjaro decide to change the name in the first place?

yees... got it fixed with applying udev rule to rename/force_name it back to enp24p0 and everything went back to normal, but initially realizing what's wrong in the first place (the initial random name change itself) took like 30m at least (because most of stuff on the computer itself was working fine, just some external services failing) and another 15 to find solution and apply it...

It doesnt seem like manjaro would be to blame then ..

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I use the net.ifnames=0 kernel flag. It's easier for me to remember wlan0, eth0, etc.

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systemd is naming network interfaces according to a the "predictable names" scheme. This scheme involves pcie bus number etc. And I guess that can change during a BIOS upgrade.

https://www.freedesktop.org/wiki/Software/systemd/PredictableNetworkInterfaceNames/

And it can be disabled:

https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Network_configuration#Revert_to_traditional_interface_names

You changed your interface name already via udev but here is a link for it anyways:

https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Network_configuration#Change_interface_name

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I don't mind the name format, as long as it sticks to one and stays this way permanently.
Apparently this "traditional" way doesn't use fixed names either when you have multiple network nics. Quote from your link:

"As the driver probing is generally not predictable for modern technology this means that as soon as multiple network interfaces are available the assignment of the names "eth0", "eth1" and so on is generally not fixed anymore and it might very well happen that "eth0" on one boot ends up being "eth1" on the next."

So going back there isn't exactly a solution (only for those with 1 nic). So how the new "predictable" suddenly became "unpredictable"? BIOS update should not change hardware and PCIE lanes or whatever ... but apparently it can :cactus: :confounded:

The cool thing about the udev rule though is that I can rename it to whatever I want ... like "honeypot" or "interwebs" or "darkweb" or "whatever" even. :stuck_out_tongue:

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