Grub_cmdline_linux_default

I see in other examples, this entry in grub:

GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="resume=UUID=d3211b27-99fb-4735-a0cc-983721ff1ed8 quiet splash"

Mine looks like this: (and I have it comented out to see the log)

GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash"

Do I need: 'resume=UUID=....' part? If so, which partition number I need to put in, root, boot...? To complicate matter a little bit more, I have ms-dos partition table, I don't need /boot partition, but I have it set up regardless.

The reason I'm asking is, this is fresh install, but computer seems to hang up for several seconds before screen comes up. I did change fstab to reflect SSD so there is no auto trimming at boot. If I run systemd-analyze blame numbers looks great, but I don't thrust these numbers :slight_smile: it feels to slow.

Upper part of my grub:

GRUB_DEFAULT=saved
GRUB_TIMEOUT=1
GRUB_DISTRIBUTOR="Manjaro"
GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash"
GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="scsi_mod.use_blk_mq=1"
GRUB_SAVEDEFAULT=true
GRUB_PRELOAD_MODULES="part_gpt part_msdos"

The resume= part is for hibernation. It tells where to look for the hibernated data when resuming, usually in the swap partition. The UUID should be the swap partition's.

If you don't use hibernate then it's not necessary.

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You do not have a swap partition, it is not in your fstab. That is why you do not have this 'resume' in your grub.

Suggest you read up more linux fundamentals or google more.
If you still have problem understanding anything, we're more than happy to help, but please try to look up yourself first.
And 'Don't shoot and ask questions later.' Many tragedies have befallen those who did it (and yet they stand unrepentant).

Well failure can be the best way to learn. Progress is often hinged on 'aha's and elimination. But also, maybe understand how to land your jetplane before taking off. Most things are relative. Thats why I have a trashbox for being crazy on :wink:
(read - there are places where people throw away totally usable pc components ... so build a frankenstein monster and see if you can set it on fire.. maybe through bluetooth)

1 Like

Thank you everyone for all the answers!

There is a lot to be learned, and for some senile brain, that is switching from windows to Linux is sometimes overwhelmingly a lot of information to digest. I do also search for the answers and many problems I run into I did solve without asking here. But sometimes or you just can't find the answer, maybe you are searching it with wrong keywords, or sometimes there is just no time for it. (as was with this example) Also, as not native English speaker, and as someone too old for new technologies, I will admit, most of the time I get lost in information overload. Many times I'm reading over same pages several times over and over and I'm still not sure what to do. Also I just can't find any use of man command. Instead of simple example, there are tens of pages and one is more confusing than other until I usually give up. Now a days I just stay away from man pages like they are cursed. Maybe I'm just too old for all the new technologies. For example, I don't even have a smart phone. Because of all this I mentioned above, sometimes is just so much easier and so much less frustrating to just ask the question.

And even as fresh beginner, I also try to help and answer if I can/know, so I'm not just asking: :slight_smile:

So for all these reasons above, forgive me if I sometimes ask a question that I should find answer to it by myself. Frankly, you don't want to become process of learning so hard that you give up on learning.

Thank you very much for your answer! And now that I know the answer, it makes sense :slight_smile:

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